Disruptive Presence: Twenty-First-Century Shifts in Spectatorship and Audience Research

Abstract

An editorial introduction to this special issue on twenty-first spectatorship.

Author Biographies

Kelsey Jacobson, Queen's Unviersity
Kelsey Jacobson is an assistant professor in the Dan School of Drama and Music at Queen’s University. Her current research focuses on audience perception and locations of onstage realness in contemporary Canadian performance.
Scott Mealey, University of Toronto
Scott Mealey is a PhD candidate in the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Toronto. His thesis interrogates the role of intent, style, and familiarity in effecting attitudinal changes in theatre spectators.
Jenny Salisbury, University of Toronto

Jenny Salisbury is a PhD candidate in the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance at the University of Toronto. Her teaching and research interests include community-engaged theatre and documentary and applied theatre, with an emphasis on Canadian play creation and audiences.

References

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Published
2019-09-15